Trespassing on Trinitarian Territory

Trespassing on Trinitarian Territory

Concerning the issue of divine and human free agency, Michael Horton argues that those on both sides of the debate often exhibit a rationalistic tendency towards univocity. He writes: Hyper-Calvinism shares with Arminianism (and especially open theism) a rationalistic tendency toward a univocal interpretation of the noun “freedom.” The one begins with the central dogma of omnicausalism and the other with the central dogma of libertarian free...

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Likelihood, Plausibility, and Sola Scriptura

Likelihood, Plausibility, and Sola Scriptura

This is an excerpt from my forthcoming book, tentatively titled I Fought the Church (and the Church Won). Enjoy. And play nice.  As I continued wrestling through the issues of church authority and its relation to Scripture, one of the questions I kept returning to was that of likelihood. “All things being equal,” I would ask myself, “which is more likely: that Jesus had intended to establish his church in such a way that it was to be...

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All Law is Not Created Equal

All Law is Not Created Equal

There is no small amount of confusion in Catholic/Protestant discussions over the issue of God’s law. Protestants constantly accuse Catholics of teaching some sort of salvation by law or works, and regardless of how often or how strongly Catholics insist that they believe no such thing, the charges continue. Part of the problem, it seems to me, is that many Protestants — especially Lutherans or those Reformed who lean that way...

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On Gentile Justification and Jewish Jealousy

On Gentile Justification and Jewish Jealousy

Former Catholic Timothy Kauffman has written a couple posts about me at his new blog, Out of His Mouth  (a blog whose purpose is to “wield the sword of truth in defense of the faith, and refute the errors in which [the author] was once enslaved.” His latest article takes me to task over my “succumbing to Roman arguments about the meaning of Romans 2:13” (a charge which actually thrills me because it demonstrates that...

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Appetite for Disruption

Appetite for Disruption

One of the issues that distinguishes Catholicism from Protestantism (and which has come up in the last couple threads here) is the relationship of grace to nature. When I was Reformed, I constantly heard that the last thing in the world the gospel did was reinforce what natural man already knew to be true, but rather, the gospel comes in to disrupt, to disturb, and to turn man’s instincts on their head. You see, natural man is Pelagian and...

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