On Lighthearted Tragedy

On Lighthearted Tragedy

Peter Leithart wrote a piece for First ThingsĀ  recently titled “The Tragedy of Conversion.” Now as you probably know, Peter and I have a quite a history, so while I doubt I was the sole inspiration for his lament, I’m sure I was at least a significant part of it. Leithart makes it clear that what he considers “tragic” are “cross-Christian conversions, from Protestant to Catholicism or Orthodoxy, or the...

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Christianity and Protestantism

Christianity and Protestantism

As I mentioned a couple posts ago, every now and then I hope to shift gears a bit and write from a more personal perspective about what becoming a Catholic has been like, and how Protestantism appears now that it is in my rearview mirror. One thing I have begun to notice — especially after starting to fall in love with G.K. Chesterton about five years ago — is how practically and ecclesiologically atheistic Protestantism seems from a...

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The Walls of a Playground

The Walls of a Playground

Whenever I am in Europe my reading always gravitates toward Chesterton. At the moment I am in Barcelona (whose nightlife is a delicate balance between anarchy and revelry on the one hand, and, umm… that’s pretty much it), and I have been reading and reflecting on Chesterton’s ideas about asceticism and conditional joy. It is quite popular among many Christians to insist that any works done by believers, even if they are...

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The Destiny of the Species: The Chicken and the Egg

In the third chapter of The Destiny of the Species I argue that the only clear vantage point from which man can be understood is that of the future. It is not enough to long for heaven merely as a coping device designed to take our minds off how much we lament our earthly lot. No, a legitimate otherworldliness must arise not only from an appreciation of the badness of this age (or for that matter, the goodness of the next), but from the fact...

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In Praise of Irrational Patriotism

In the comments under a previous couple of threads I have been accused of being unpatriotic: Why, unlike Charles Hodge — Old School Presbyterian patriarch of the highest order — is it so difficult for some Reformed men today to express a simple, heartfelt love for their country? Why, when someone points this out, is the default response to attack Republicans and political conservatives? Is it because these men really can’t...

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“Looking for Jesus and His Mother”

I recently came across (what I eventually realized was) a satirical piece about Mark Driscoll, pastor of Seattle’s Mars Hill Church. According to the article, Driscoll was speaking at a recent men’s conference when he launched into one of his tirades about how effeminate everyone except him and the apostles is. The satirized Driscoll explained: “The problem with our churches today is that the lead pastor is some sissy boy who...

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