Part II – Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment

Part II – Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment

In response to the last post (Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment), I have been asked about Pope Saint John Paul’s II comment on Christ’s cry, taken from one his Encyclical On the Christian Meaning of Human Suffering: One can say that these words on abandonment are born at the level of that inseparable union of the Son with the Father, and are born because the Father “laid on him the iniquity of us all”. They also...

Read More

The Cross: Creating a Context for Grace

The Cross: Creating a Context for Grace

Since our discussion of Pope Francis’s recent homily has led us to a discussion of the cross, I thought I’d slow things down for a while and consider the Catholic understanding of the atonement in a bit more detail. For the purposes of our consideration, I will take a page out of my Paradigms Handbook and posit a general idea about the cross and what it was intended to accomplish, and from that basic articulation we will look at the...

Read More

Death As a Stranger

“Let us now descend into the terrible, faceless depths of death as a stranger,” writes Peter Kreeft in his book Love Is Stronger Than Death. This second of death’s five faces is the darkest, “a dead relationship with death.” The reason for this is that this posture of death corresponds to the human emotion not of hate (like one would feel towards an enemy), but of indiff-erence (like one who feels nothing at all). After all, the...

Read More

Death As An Enemy

“Death wears five faces,” writes Peter Kreeft, “and the only way to see each of them is to have seen the others first. Each face is a password to the next.” Death’s first face, argues Kreeft, is that of an enemy. Its subsequent faces are that of a stranger, a friend, a mother, and finally, a lover. “If death does not first appear to us as an enemy, then it cannot appear truly as a friend, or as anything greater than a friend. Death...

Read More

Love Is Stronger Than Death

“Life is always fatal,” writes Boston College philosopher Peter Kreeft in his pro-found little book Love Is Stronger Than Death. “No one gets out of it alive.” * In his introduction to the work he claims that life is either totally meaningful or totally meaningless, and determining which statement is true is only possible by first determining what death is. “We do not know why we die,” Kreeft writes,...

Read More
wordpress visitor