Part II – Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment

Part II – Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment

In response to the last post (Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment), I have been asked about Pope Saint John Paul’s II comment on Christ’s cry, taken from one his Encyclical On the Christian Meaning of Human Suffering: One can say that these words on abandonment are born at the level of that inseparable union of the Son with the Father, and are born because the Father “laid on him the iniquity of us all”. They also...

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Appetite for Disruption

Appetite for Disruption

One of the issues that distinguishes Catholicism from Protestantism (and which has come up in the last couple threads here) is the relationship of grace to nature. When I was Reformed, I constantly heard that the last thing in the world the gospel did was reinforce what natural man already knew to be true, but rather, the gospel comes in to disrupt, to disturb, and to turn man’s instincts on their head. You see, natural man is Pelagian and...

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Rome, Geneva, and the Incarnation’s Native Soil

Rome, Geneva, and the Incarnation’s Native Soil

OK, I’m going to try an experiment here, so bear with me. I have gotten a handful of complaints over the last few months about the free-for-all nature of the comments here — off-topic, everything-thrown-at-the-Catholic-Church-but-the-kitchen-sink, uncharitable, impossible to follow or truly engage, etc. — and my response has always been that I simply don’t have the time to respond to all the comments that come in or...

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Trinity, Incarnation, and Participation

Trinity, Incarnation, and Participation

In my last post on advent and the Incarnation, I mentioned that the entire Catholic gospel is focused on the ontological participation that the believer enjoys with the holy Trinity, by means of the Eucharistic flesh of Christ, alluding to the oft-quoted idea found in so many of the church fathers that God became man so that man could become God. An objection was raised to this idea due to its alleged inconsistency with monotheism: If there is...

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Advent, Incarnation, and Visibility

Advent, Incarnation, and Visibility

Since the season of advent is right around the corner, I thought I’d offer a personal reflection on the Incarnation from a newly Catholic perspective, as well as suggest areas where I think Catholicism exhibits the dynamic of the Incarnation more faithfully than Protestantism does. Consider first the realm of ecclesiology (which is related to Christology most obviously because the Church is the Body of Christ). In Protestantism, there is...

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This is the Story of a Divine Family. . . .

This is the Story of a Divine Family. . . .

Returning once again to the theme of what it feels like to be a brand new Catholic after having spent the better part of my life in some form of Protestant/Reformed ministry, the issue I’d like to bring up in this post may sound a bit odd at first, but here goes: In all honesty, I feel like for the first time in my life I am a real Trinitarian and a genuine Chalcedonian. Now, I can already anticipate the Protestant “Harumphs!”...

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