Daniel and the Universal Kingdom

Daniel and the Universal Kingdom

Daniel 2 contains a fascinating prophecy which speaks of God’s plan to set up a Kingdom upon earth that is not of human origin and will come to cover the whole earth. Christians as far back as the Early Church Fathers have interpreted this prophecy as referring to the Catholic Church being established by Christ, expanding all over the world, and lasting forever. After reflecting upon the prophecy, I see no other plausible interpretation. Let...

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The Mediocrity of the New Covenant?

The Mediocrity of the New Covenant?

According to Reformed Theology, even the “good works” which Christians are called to do are “tainted by sin”. And on top of that, Reformed theology says these “good works” are only pleasing to God in so far as they are “covered by the blood and righteousness of Christ”. But if you stop and think about what this is saying, no Christian should be comfortable with such teaching. Why would God give us a new heart and give us the...

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The New Covenant, Baptism, and Properly-Realized Eschatology

The New Covenant, Baptism, and Properly-Realized Eschatology

The question of whether or not to baptize infants has been a very divisive issue throughout the history of Protestantism, dividing Protestantism roughly in half between Lutheran/Reformed and Baptist/Non-Denominational traditions. But instead of writing a post on how Sola Scriptura has been unable to address this “church-dividing issue,” I will instead focus on another issue, specifically the Reformed understanding of infant baptism...

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The Kingdom of God, Forensically Considered

The Kingdom of God, Forensically Considered

**This is a guest post by Jonathan Prejean** Owing largely to Reformation-era polemics, the application of legal descriptions in the context of historical Christian orthodoxy appears to have been badly misunderstood. The charge is that the Eastern Fathers were pretty much oblivious to legal metaphors, the Western Fathers were cognizant but confused owing to translation errors (specifically the use of iustificare, to make righteous), and only the...

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Calvinism, Catholicism, and the Cross of Calvary

Calvinism, Catholicism, and the Cross of Calvary

Despite media pundits and Protestant bloggers tripping over themselves to opine on (their complete misunderstandings of) Pope Francis’s recent homily, I do think his remarks provide a good springboard for discussion about what Rome and Geneva think the cross actually accomplishes. Where the Reformed get tripped up is over Francis’s use of the word “redeemed” and its application to all people, including atheists....

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Christianity and Protestantism

Christianity and Protestantism

As I mentioned a couple posts ago, every now and then I hope to shift gears a bit and write from a more personal perspective about what becoming a Catholic has been like, and how Protestantism appears now that it is in my rearview mirror. One thing I have begun to notice — especially after starting to fall in love with G.K. Chesterton about five years ago — is how practically and ecclesiologically atheistic Protestantism seems from a...

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