Rome, Geneva, and the Incarnation’s Native Soil

Rome, Geneva, and the Incarnation’s Native Soil

OK, I’m going to try an experiment here, so bear with me. I have gotten a handful of complaints over the last few months about the free-for-all nature of the comments here — off-topic, everything-thrown-at-the-Catholic-Church-but-the-kitchen-sink, uncharitable, impossible to follow or truly engage, etc. — and my response has always been that I simply don’t have the time to respond to all the comments that come in or...

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Trinity, Incarnation, and Participation

Trinity, Incarnation, and Participation

In my last post on advent and the Incarnation, I mentioned that the entire Catholic gospel is focused on the ontological participation that the believer enjoys with the holy Trinity, by means of the Eucharistic flesh of Christ, alluding to the oft-quoted idea found in so many of the church fathers that God became man so that man could become God. An objection was raised to this idea due to its alleged inconsistency with monotheism: If there is...

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Advent, Incarnation, and Visibility

Advent, Incarnation, and Visibility

Since the season of advent is right around the corner, I thought I’d offer a personal reflection on the Incarnation from a newly Catholic perspective, as well as suggest areas where I think Catholicism exhibits the dynamic of the Incarnation more faithfully than Protestantism does. Consider first the realm of ecclesiology (which is related to Christology most obviously because the Church is the Body of Christ). In Protestantism, there is...

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ECFs vs. WCF, Part 2

ECFs vs. WCF, Part 2

In response to those who have insisted that the dogma of transubstantiation is an illegitimate importation of medieval metaphysics into the teachings of the early church fathers (who denied that the substance of the bread and wine are changed into the very body and blood of Christ), I would adduce the following passages: For not as common bread nor common drink do we receive these; but since Jesus Christ our Savior was made incarnate by the word...

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New Passover for a New Exodus

New Passover for a New Exodus

Continuing our series on the Eucharist, Catholics understand Jesus to be a new Moses, and what kind of new Moses would he be if he did not inaugurate a new Exodus? And of course, what was it that launched the first Exodus but the celebration of the Passover? A new Exodus under the leadership of a new Moses, then, calls for a new Passover to kick things off. St. Paul clearly understood this typology. He wrote to the Corinthians in his first...

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ECFs vs. WCF

ECFs vs. WCF

Before we go any further in our series on the Eucharist, there’re a couple things I’d like to say. First, enough with the jumping from the theological or exegetical point under discussion to the whole throw-everything-at-the-Catholic-Church-but-the-kitchen-sink tactic, as if an appeal to lesbian nuns discredits the idea that the Eucharist is a sacrifice. Last I checked, guitars have room for more than one string, but if all you want...

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