This is the Story of a Divine Family. . . .

This is the Story of a Divine Family. . . .

Returning once again to the theme of what it feels like to be a brand new Catholic after having spent the better part of my life in some form of Protestant/Reformed ministry, the issue I’d like to bring up in this post may sound a bit odd at first, but here goes: In all honesty, I feel like for the first time in my life I am a real Trinitarian and a genuine Chalcedonian. Now, I can already anticipate the Protestant “Harumphs!”...

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How to Reach Non-Whites

Michael Horton makes a great point about context-ualization in his recent article “Does Anybody Really know What Time It Is?” He writes: If we are going to understand our times–and how the gospel addresses us in them–con-textualization itself will have to be “context-ualized.” In other words, we have to realize that this concept too belongs a particular pattern of thinking and web of assumptions we have...

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Do Pagans Make the Best Vosians?

I just preached from Romans 8:18-25 where Paul gives, in the words of John Murray, his commentary on Genesis 3:17-18. The creation has fallen under curse and, therefore, groans under the weight of its bondage to decay, longing for the liberty that will accompany the glorification of the seed of the woman. Yes, this relates to the way the believer should think about popular culture. If the sub-human created order can recognize that something is...

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Homo Faber, Meet Homo Ludens

Playing off of the Latin title for man, Homo Sapiens, which means “man the wise,” various authors have sought to describe man by different characteristics. Among these are Homo Faber (“man the worker”) and Homo Ludens (“man the player”). I pointed out in a previous post that work is a pre-fall activity, and that Adam was commissioned to guard and care for the garden as part of his image-bearing activity in the...

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Darwinism in the Workplace

I mentioned in an earlier post that the phenomenon of “job dissatisfaction” is not simply a symptom of a spoiled culture with nothing to do but complain that the AC in our corner office is too loud and interferes with our Blue Tooth, but in fact, it goes back to the fall of man when God cursed his labors and told him that work would continue in the post-fall world, but it will be a total pain. We’re supposed to feel frustrated,...

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Edwardsian Anthropology

“The affections,” writes Jonathan Edwards, “are no other than the more vigorous and sensible exercises of the inclination and will of the soul.” Edwards taught that God has endued the soul with two faculties; the first is that by which the soul perceives, discerns, and views things (the understanding), and the second is that by which the soul does not merely perceive things, but is in some way inclined with respect to the...

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