Part II – Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment

Part II – Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment

In response to the last post (Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment), I have been asked about Pope Saint John Paul’s II comment on Christ’s cry, taken from one his Encyclical On the Christian Meaning of Human Suffering: One can say that these words on abandonment are born at the level of that inseparable union of the Son with the Father, and are born because the Father “laid on him the iniquity of us all”. They also...

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On Bodies Visible and Invisible

On Bodies Visible and Invisible

It has become apparent after the post addressing the Reformed dilemma regarding Infant Baptism and the New Covenant that another closely-linked Protestant issue needs to be addressed. That issue is the widespread (even universal) belief among Protestants that there is a “Visible Church” and an “Invisible Church.” According to the Westminster Confession, the Invisible Church “consists of the whole number of the elect,” while the...

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The New Covenant, Baptism, and Properly-Realized Eschatology

The New Covenant, Baptism, and Properly-Realized Eschatology

The question of whether or not to baptize infants has been a very divisive issue throughout the history of Protestantism, dividing Protestantism roughly in half between Lutheran/Reformed and Baptist/Non-Denominational traditions. But instead of writing a post on how Sola Scriptura has been unable to address this “church-dividing issue,” I will instead focus on another issue, specifically the Reformed understanding of infant baptism...

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Appetite for Disruption

Appetite for Disruption

One of the issues that distinguishes Catholicism from Protestantism (and which has come up in the last couple threads here) is the relationship of grace to nature. When I was Reformed, I constantly heard that the last thing in the world the gospel did was reinforce what natural man already knew to be true, but rather, the gospel comes in to disrupt, to disturb, and to turn man’s instincts on their head. You see, natural man is Pelagian and...

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Rome, Geneva, and the Incarnation’s Native Soil

Rome, Geneva, and the Incarnation’s Native Soil

OK, I’m going to try an experiment here, so bear with me. I have gotten a handful of complaints over the last few months about the free-for-all nature of the comments here — off-topic, everything-thrown-at-the-Catholic-Church-but-the-kitchen-sink, uncharitable, impossible to follow or truly engage, etc. — and my response has always been that I simply don’t have the time to respond to all the comments that come in or...

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Confessions of an Unclenched Catholic

Confessions of an Unclenched Catholic

As many of you know, I was on EWTN’s The Journey Home  this past week, and I promised to post the video when it became available. Here you go: I would like to thank you all for the positive feedback you’ve sent my way (this site has had no fewer than 1,000 and as many as 3,500 unique visitors per day since last Monday). One of the best things I heard (it struck me most coming from an old Calvary pastor friend, although others have...

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