Part II – Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment

Part II – Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment

In response to the last post (Understanding Christ’s Cry of Abandonment), I have been asked about Pope Saint John Paul’s II comment on Christ’s cry, taken from one his Encyclical On the Christian Meaning of Human Suffering: One can say that these words on abandonment are born at the level of that inseparable union of the Son with the Father, and are born because the Father “laid on him the iniquity of us all”. They also...

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Daniel and the Universal Kingdom

Daniel and the Universal Kingdom

Daniel 2 contains a fascinating prophecy which speaks of God’s plan to set up a Kingdom upon earth that is not of human origin and will come to cover the whole earth. Christians as far back as the Early Church Fathers have interpreted this prophecy as referring to the Catholic Church being established by Christ, expanding all over the world, and lasting forever. After reflecting upon the prophecy, I see no other plausible interpretation. Let...

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The New Covenant, Baptism, and Properly-Realized Eschatology

The New Covenant, Baptism, and Properly-Realized Eschatology

The question of whether or not to baptize infants has been a very divisive issue throughout the history of Protestantism, dividing Protestantism roughly in half between Lutheran/Reformed and Baptist/Non-Denominational traditions. But instead of writing a post on how Sola Scriptura has been unable to address this “church-dividing issue,” I will instead focus on another issue, specifically the Reformed understanding of infant baptism...

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Calvinism, Catholicism, and the Cross of Calvary

Calvinism, Catholicism, and the Cross of Calvary

Despite media pundits and Protestant bloggers tripping over themselves to opine on (their complete misunderstandings of) Pope Francis’s recent homily, I do think his remarks provide a good springboard for discussion about what Rome and Geneva think the cross actually accomplishes. Where the Reformed get tripped up is over Francis’s use of the word “redeemed” and its application to all people, including atheists....

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Boasting, Eschatologically Considered

Boasting, Eschatologically Considered

One of the most oft-repeated objections to the Catholic paradigm goes like this: “If the Catholic gospel is true, and if our works (even if Spirit-wrought) play some contributory role in our justification, then the door is thereby left open for boasting, which Paul in Romans 3 and 4 explicitly forbids. Therefore some articulation of the gospel is required that makes boasting impossible.” I would like to make a few points by way of...

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Children of the Corn(elius)

Children of the Corn(elius)

In my last post I argued that one of the strongest arguments for reading Romans 2:13 as normative rather than hypothetical is the fact that Paul, after insisting that “the doers of the law will be justified,” spends the remainder of the chapter illustrating this principle by appealing to actual people, namely, Gentiles who obey the precepts of the law despite not being possessors of it by birthright. The way they can do this is...

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