Stuff I Like: Wordsmithing and Woe

Stuff I Like: Wordsmithing and Woe

Being a writer myself, I have a deep affinity for words and their smithing. I have long maintained that it’s one thing to tell a great story, but another to tell it well, and beautifully. I would consider popular tales like the Millennium Trilogy, the five volumes of A Song of Ice and Fire, and the Harry Potter  series to be excellent stories, but to be honest, while reading them I rarely stopped and backtracked in order to re-read a...

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Christianity and Protestantism

Christianity and Protestantism

As I mentioned a couple posts ago, every now and then I hope to shift gears a bit and write from a more personal perspective about what becoming a Catholic has been like, and how Protestantism appears now that it is in my rearview mirror. One thing I have begun to notice — especially after starting to fall in love with G.K. Chesterton about five years ago — is how practically and ecclesiologically atheistic Protestantism seems from a...

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Are There Somber Calvinists in Springfield?

Last week I mentioned that I am reading David Dark’s book Everyday Apocalypse, which surveys popular culture from Flannery O’Connor and the Coen brothers to Radiohead and The Matrix, seeking to recognize the ways in which the apocalyptic truths of the coming age creep into this one, even in ways unbeknownst to the artists themselves. While Dark, so far anyway, refrains from calling all of life sacramental, he has no love for the...

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Apocalypse Now?

I just started reading David Dark’s book Everyday Apocalypse which, as far as I can tell, focuses on the various ways in which the dynamics of the future intrude into this present age. I say various ways because Dark has a much more sacramental view of the world than does your garden variety confessionalist (like me). For Dark, we experience spiritual realities not merely through the means of grace given to the visible church, but through the...

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Pierced by a Freeway

Speaking of sacramental worldviews, perhaps no one does a better job of beholding nature through the lens of spiritual reality that Bono himself. In the song “Heartland” from 1988’s Rattle and Hum, he sings about the Mississippi River using the metaphor of a woman, and then goes on to sing: She feels like water in my hand; Freeway, like a river, cuts through this land Into the side of love, like a burning spear. Just like...

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Lonely Mountains, Sleeping Adams, Dancing Angels, and the Color Green

I had a great conversation over cigars and stout with my good pal Armando on Wednesday, and we were discussing the way men like Chesterton, Bono, Rich Mullins, C.S. Lewis, and others wrote about God’s involvement in the world (I have been told by my Catholic friends that these men have a “sacramental worldview,” which I sort of understand, but not really). Anyway, they bring to the table a kind of richness and appreciation of...

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