On Distinguishing Between Synonyms

On Distinguishing Between Synonyms

As those who have been following my series on paradigms know, I have been arguing that there is a vast amount of New Testament data that may be able to be squeezed into just about any theological system, but nonetheless fits best within a Catholic paradigm. Indeed, much of this data simply would not have arisen from a (proto) Protestant paradigm at all, despite Protestants wholeheartedly affirming such passages and doing their best to fit (or...

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Blamelessness on Judgment Day

Blamelessness on Judgment Day

Before we jump into Romans 4 and begin discussing Paul’s locus classicus  on imputation I thought it would be a good idea to first investigate a claim that is integral to the way Reformed folks treat the idea that God “imputes” righteousness to sinners. The claim we need to consider is the one that says that God demands a sinless perfection of would-be saints that is defined according to the letter of the law. To put it...

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“The Doers of the Law Will Be Justified”

“The Doers of the Law Will Be Justified”

Since the issue has arisen here recently, I’d like to comment on a well-known and controversial passage: Romans 2:13. To set the text in context, Paul leads up to the passage we’re considering by saying: He will render to each one according to his works: to those who by patience in well-doing seek for glory and honor and immortality, he will give eternal life; but for those who are self-seeking and do not obey the truth, but obey...

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Setting the Reformed Record Straight

The discussion over at Called to Communion on the post titled “How John Calvin Made Me a Catholic” has recently turned to the supposed absence of the notion of inward renewal and the need for practical holiness in Reformed thought. One commenter wrote: [Contrary to what Reformed theology teaches], salvation must be a real deliverance from the power of sin and death and transformation in the Spirit. If it is not, then I will take my Hell...

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Choosing the Path of Most Resistance

I came across a passage in Chesterton recently that ties in well with my final post in the Homo Liturgicus series. I argued there that the New Covenant ethic—and Christian living in general—cannot be understood without a robust doctrine of sacrifice. As Paul teaches in I Corinthians 9, while he couldn’t boast in his preaching of the gospel (since he was commanded to do so by the Lord, and we cannot boast in merely doing what we’re told),...

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The 411 on the LGD

Over at Green Baggins the hot topic of late has been the relationship between the distinction between law and gospel and the doctrine of justification by faith alone (see the posts spanning from 3/29/10 – 4/2/10 in particular). The question being raised is, “Can someone who denies the law/gospel distinction [LGD] simultaneously affirm sola fide without messing everything up in the process?” Lane’s answer has been “No,” and he has...

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