Heavy for the Vintage

Posted by on November 10, 2013 in Common Grace, Featured, Heavy for the Vintage, Incarnation, Natural Law, Pop Culture, The Two Kingdoms | 0 comments

I would like take a quick break from our discussion about paradigms Protestant and Catholic in order to draw everyone’s attention to a little side project that a few friends of mine and I are just now beginning. It’s basically a small community of artists, writers, and thinkers from varying backgrounds whose aim is simply to give expression to the identity we share as misfits and malcontents in this cruel and beautiful world of ours.

We call it Heavy for the Vintage, which, as some of you may recognize, is an allusion to one of my favorite lines of Steinbeck’s:

“. . . and in the eyes of the people there is a failure; and in the eyes of the hungry there is a growing wrath. In the souls of the people the grapes of wrath are filling and growing heavy, growing heavy for the vintage.”

Presently there is a single blog post published, which will hopefully be followed with further articles, poetry, graphic art, and selections from fictional pieces we are working on.

I would invite all of you to stop by and perhaps even join the conversation, but with this caveat: This is not a religious site, and neither are all the members Christians. So if you do enter the fray, please keep in mind that certain things that you may consider safe to presuppose here will not be shared by everyone there. Heavy for the Vintage  is intended as a means to give expression to ideas and feelings that make us human, and while grace perfects nature and Christianity places an exclamation point after all true things, it’s also the case that Jesus’ divinity did not swallow up his humanity. Earth is still earth and humanity is still humanity, even when those things are separated from, or considered in distinction from, heavenly realities.

The other misfits and malcontents and I will be promoting the site over the next several weeks in the hopes of getting on people’s radar, so if you are someone who considers yourself artistic or creative, or if you can identify with the burden and ache that both St. Paul and Steinbeck describe, then by all means, pop in and make yourself at home.

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